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Old 07-21-2008, 12:12 PM   #5
slayda
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patricia View Post
A classic anarchist text, written by a man who started life as a Russian prince. The book recently appeared in PG.

From the original publisher’s blurb:
The Conquest of Bread is a revolutionary idyll, a beautiful outline sketch of a future society based on liberty, equality and fraternity. It is, in Kropotkin's own words, "a study of the needs of humanity, and of the economic means to satisfy them." Read in conjunction with the same author's "Fields, Factories and Workshops," it meets all the difficulties of the social inquirer who says: "The Anarchist ideal is alluring, but how could you work it out?"
About the Author.
Prince Peter Alexeivitch Kropotkin, (1842-1921): revolutionary and scientist, was descended from the old Russian nobility, but decided, at the age of thirty, to throw in his lot with the social rebels not only of his own country, but of the entire world. He became the intellectual leader of Anarchist-Communism; took part in the labor movement; wrote many books and pamphlets; established Le Révolté in Geneva and Freedom in London; contributed to the Encyclopedia Britannica; was twice imprisoned because of his radical activities; and twice visited America. After the Bolshevist revolution he returned to Russia, kept himself apart from Soviet activities, and died true to his ideals.
Another Russian writer that lived through this era is Ayn Rand (see "Atlas Shrugged"). She had idylls that seem to oppose those mentioned above which she idealized in her novels. Of course the real world is not idealized as the novels are but the novels do make a point and are, IMO, interesting reading. Although not in the public domain nor in any ebook format that I can find, I highly recommend it, especially as it presents the other side of the picture.
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