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Old 08-16-2012, 06:29 AM   #1
GrannyGrump
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Grahame, Kenneth: The Wind in the Willows (Illustrated). v1. 16 August 2012

Written by Kenneth Grahame (1859 - 1932), the author of “The Wind in the Willows,” “The Golden Age,” “Dream Days,” “Pagan Papers,” “The Headswoman” etc.

Illustrations by Paul Bransom (1885 - 1979), noted illustrator of animals.

First published 1908. This illustrated version is in the public domain in the USA because it was published before 1923.

Finding the secret of the wind is hard enough without Mole wandering off into the Wild Wood and getting caught in a snowstorm or Toad stealing motorcars and landing in jail. Between practical Water Rat and wise old Badger, the four of them manage, after many great adventures and much laughter, to settle down to a quiet roar with an understanding of the wind's song and the Wild Wood.
Internet Book List
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“The Wind in the Willows” (1908) is a classic of children’s literature. Alternately slow moving and fast paced, it focuses on four anthropomorphised animal characters in a pastoral version of England. The novel is notable for its mixture of mysticism, adventure, morality, and camaraderie and celebrated for its evocation of the nature of the Thames valley.
In 1908 Grahame retired from his position as secretary of the Bank of England . . . and spent his time by the River Thames doing much as the animal characters in his book do—namely, as one of the most famous phrases from the book says, “simply messing about in boats”—and wrote down the bed-time stories he had been telling his son. The wayward headstrong nature he saw in his little son Alastair (also known as "Mouse") he transformed into the swaggering Mr. Toad, one of the book’s four principal characters.
The book was a hit and is still enjoyed by adults and children today, while Toad remains one of the most celebrated and beloved characters. The book has seen numerous adaptations for stage, film, radio, and television; spawned a number of sequels by other authors, and has won several awards.
Information adapted from Wikipedia

If you (or your children) have never read the original “Wind in the Willows,” you owe it to yourself to indulge in a wonderful treat.

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10 beautiful full-page color illustrations. Small drop caps. Curly quotes, em dashes, etc. As usual, I've also uploaded a version with plain large-caps if your reader dislikes drop-caps. Enjoy!
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Last edited by GrannyGrump; 04-19-2013 at 02:22 AM.
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