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Old 08-15-2012, 07:42 AM   #15
Ralph Sir Edward
Gentleman & Cynic
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Posts: 5,605
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Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: 5 generation native Texan
Device: BeBook/Openinkpot, CYbook 3rd gen awaiting RTF software upgrade
Quote:
Originally Posted by fjtorres View Post
BILL, THE GALACTIC HERO mourns, too.
Not good.
DEATHWORLD 2: THE ETHICAL ENGINEER is still among my all-time favorites. (And a must-read for anybody engaged in online discussions. )
Absolutely bang on. DEATHWORLD 2: THE ETHICAL ENGINEER teaches you more about people than a half-dozen philosophers...

He always wrote with a light touch, not just in a comedic sense, but as a writing style. No heavy descriptions, just what was needed. No show of great knowledge, (it was there, but always carefully buried), but letting the events of the story do the showing. No elegant and high-brow diction, but a vocabulary that let everybody enjoy, from kids to adults.

And such rattling good stories...

He skewered Hollywood and time travel at the same time (The Technicolor Time Machine).

The generation ship and Mayan culture in Captive Universe.

He gave a real, in-depth look at the ramifications of Matter Transmission in a string of short stories.

And lots of short stories...(The Streets of Askeron, 'Not Me, Not Amos Cabot', I Always Do What Teddy Says, We Ate The Whole Thing....)

And finally, a big pusher of Esperanto.

A life well-lived. (And he shared the best parts with us).
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