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Old 08-10-2012, 08:55 PM   #24
gmw
cacoethes scribendi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven Lyle Jordan View Post
That's a valid method of writing as well. Generally speaking, readers who favor a particular genre are also familiar with the tropes of that genre, and expect it in the writing... they become a genre audience. If you're not sure about the audience, therefore, you can target the genre and achieve roughly the same results.
Yes, but it is often only roughly. One of the reasons I mentioned "fairy-tale" as an "effect" rather than a genre was thinking of books like "Stardust" by Neil Gaiman, which has a distinct fairy-tale feel, almost as written for a younger audience, and yet I never really felt as if the book was not also written for myself (a long time adult). I wonder how Neil would have answered the question about his target audience. There are other's I've read that are similar in their effect.
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