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Old 07-29-2012, 07:36 PM   #10
DuaneAA
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Join Date: May 2006
Location: Minnesota
Device: Samsung Galaxy Note 3 & Kindle Fire HDX
Like someone else mentioned earlier, way too much of the current crop of sci-fi and fantasy fall into the dystopian category, which holds no interest for me either.

These days probably 75% of my reading is audiobooks I listen to during my commute that I get from Audible.com and 25% is ebooks for the kindle. I looked through my history for the last couple of years and in the science fiction category I found almost nothing I would recommend. The only book I would give a marginal 'thumbs up' is "Red Moon" by David Michaels and Daniel Brenton. The main story is about the first return mission to the moon and is set 15-20 years in the future. A parallel story line tells the story of a secret Soviet manned lunar mission in 1969. The main story isn't that great, but the historical story more than makes up for it with what feels like a well-researched look into the internal politics of the Soviet space program in the 60s. I wish they had expanded that part to be the entire novel.

I think part of the problem is that I grew up in the 1960s & 1970s when the space program seemed like the pinnacle of human achievement and old-school stories about space travel seemed like a logical extension of where we were headed. But now that it has been 40 years since we have been to the moon, the space program has lost its luster, if not turned into a pathetic joke. So stories involving space travel now feel more like fantasy than sci-fi. With computers currently seeming to be the pinnacle of human achievement, the logical extension of humans merging with computers in some 'Matrix' style existence just doesn't seem to lend itself to the fun, uplifting stories people were writing 50 years ago.

Since it seems so hard to find good sci-fi, most of the books I actually read all the way to the end lately fall in the Young Adult category or other completely none sci-fi categories. Partly I think it is because light, fluffy material seems to work best when you are listening to 15-30 minute chunks in the car.

Anyway, if anyone has some suggestions for stories that have a good, fun old-school sci-fi feel while having a more contemporary writing style than the old stuff by Asimov, Clarke, etc., I would love to hear about them.

Duane
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