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Old 09-17-2005, 08:06 AM   #15
rlauzon
Wizard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmeister0
Actually, the iTune store does sell music; they are not a subscription service. Buy album. Download album. Burn to CD. Yours to keep forever. Re-rip into MP3, Ogg, or whatever. Play in your car. Play on your computer. Apple can't stop you. Ever.
That's what it is today. They also reserve the right to change those rules whenever they see fit.

Their business model - since it's based on Digital Restriction Management - is renting music.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rmeister0
My point was that you need a convergence of three things: a convenient display device, a convenient content provider, and a seamless integration of both, as well as the fact that eBooks solve a problem most people don't have.
I understand your point. But you forgot one thing: no more restrictions than what we have today on physical books.

When I buy a physical book, I can:
  • Let a friend borrow it.
  • Re-sell it.
  • Quote from it.
  • Re-read it as many times as I want.
  • Read it anywhere I want when I want.
Let a friend borrow it.

DRM takes most of those rights away from me, locks me to a device and makes me have to prove (with artificial means - like a credit card number) that I am authorized to read the eBook.

iTunes = DRM = unacceptable restrictions on the content that I have (supposedly) purchased.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rmeister0
Again, you are not representative of the mainstream; remember that many people don't even own a PDA.
But I am representative of the group of people that publishers (actually, authors) target: those who read lots of books.

I am the person who buys new technology, makes it work and shows all the non-techie people how to use it.

It's a misconception to think that I am not the person the ebook people need to please. Because without support from people like me, eBooks will fail. I am the type of person that they need to please right now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rmeister0
While we're on the topic of content: Tarzan is easy, but what about Burrough's Carson of Venus stories?
I have a few of those, but I don't remember where I got them. Because of our illegally extended copyright time limits, too many works that should have gone into the public domain are still only available in print (if you have a good used book store in your area).

Quote:
Originally Posted by rmeister0
eBooks have the potential of eliminating the concept of "out of print", but it hasn't happened yet.
And as long as copyright keeps being extended and publishers protect their outdated business model with laws and DRM "out of print" will continue to exist.
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