Thread: Literary Middlemarch by George Eliot
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Old 07-23-2012, 02:20 PM   #13
fantasyfan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bookpossum View Post

I love the way George Eliot humanises everyone, even that dry stick Casaubon, with his rows of notebooks and his endless research. Who among us who has had to write a thesis or even a major essay, has not shied away from putting pen to paper (metaphorically these days) and felt the need to do yet more research. I did have some fellow-feeling for him over that!

What a wonderful book it is. I'm not sure how long I shall take to finish it, but I shall certainly do so. And I shall enjoy seeing what others have to say on the way through.
Let me join Bookworm Girl in welcoming you to the club. I, too really liked your insight about Casaubon--whom I have tended to dismiss too readily. And you made the point very tellingly. Thank you for sharing it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bookworm_Girl View Post
Welcome to the Literary Book Club discussion, Bookpossum. This is a great point, and I liked the way you phrased it. I like the way that Eliot is able to create sympathy with the reader for the various characters despite their vices or weaknesses. For example, one is able to identify with both Dorothea and Mr. Casaubon about how their marriage does not live up to either of their expectations, thereby making both of them melancholy in the situation.
Yes, I tended too easily to forget that both Dorothea and Casaubon had very different but honestly held expectations about their roles in marriage. And so both deserve sympathy.
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