Thread: Literary Middlemarch by George Eliot
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Old 07-23-2012, 12:05 PM   #12
Bookworm_Girl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bookpossum View Post
I love the way George Eliot humanises everyone, even that dry stick Casaubon, with his rows of notebooks and his endless research. Who among us who has had to write a thesis or even a major essay, has not shied away from putting pen to paper (metaphorically these days) and felt the need to do yet more research. I did have some fellow-feeling for him over that!
Welcome to the Literary Book Club discussion, Bookpossum. This is a great point, and I liked the way you phrased it. I like the way that Eliot is able to create sympathy with the reader for the various characters despite their vices or weaknesses. For example, one is able to identify with both Dorothea and Mr. Casaubon about how their marriage does not live up to either of their expectations, thereby making both of them melancholy in the situation.

Last edited by Bookworm_Girl; 07-23-2012 at 12:07 PM.
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