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Old 07-19-2012, 09:07 AM   #28
LuvReadin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gmw View Post
How about it?

More seriously, doesn't they and their etc. cover most of the requirement? I came across this article recently: A singular use of they.
IME, that's now pretty well standard in STM (science, technical, medical) writing, certainly for UK publications. I generally only see he/she or (yuk!) s/he from writers whose first language isn't English.

Quote:
Originally Posted by desertgrandma View Post
Aack. Since there are no "genderless" people that I know of, I do not want to read a "genderless" pronoun.
Actually, from a medical perspective, there are people who are genderless. Some have been born with both sets of reproductive organs, while others are genetically one sex but physically the other. From a social context, there's an additional group of people who make a choice to be neither one nor the other.
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