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Old 07-05-2012, 10:17 AM   #5
DarkScribe
Apprentice Curmudgeon.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven Lake View Post
HA! I love your comment about the problem with language. I had a British character I wrote into my latest novel that proved to be quite the literary workout for me. I pulled it off, but it wasn't easy by a long shot. In fact, it kinda killed my interest in using British characters in my books again unless absolutely needed. heh. ^_^;;
In what way do you feel that British or American characters are different (with regard to speech) when used in a novel? If both are educated there is little to tell them apart. Even if working or Blue Collar class, unless the person is fairly old there is still little difference. The days when idiomatic differences were clearly noticed are well past - movies and television have melded speech patterns from both sides of the Atlantic. Some writers tend to make any Brit into a caricature of a 1930's Englishman - I hope that was not so in your case. Nowadays there really is little difference.
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