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Old 07-04-2012, 11:12 PM   #6
Bookworm_Girl
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Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Southwest, USA
Device: Sony 350, T2; KPW2; iPad Mini Retina; Nooks
Quote:
Originally Posted by GA Russell View Post
I think what struck me was how in only ten pages the mood shifted from the heights of joy to the depths of loss.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fantasyfan View Post
I felt that the conversation at the end with its brutal assessment of the father by his contemporaries is a very powerful conclusion as it is the first time the corruption of the world directly impinges on the child's vision.
I thought the conclusion was good too. It was a subtle transition as Joe's innocence is waning. He is obviously impacted at the beginning when he sees the men in Milan insult his father but he doesn't really understand why someone would call his dad such a name. His dad just tells him, "You got to take a lot of things in this world, Joe." He witnesses his dad and Goerge discuss fixing the race but doesn't fully comprehend even those he "knew something big was up" and then forgets about it as he roots with the crowd for Kzar to win. His dad's response this time is a little more direct, "It sure took a great jock to keep that Kzar horse from winning". He watches his dad drinking more frequently in the Paris cafes and gaining weight and yet he reflects on those times together fondly. Finally there's the last exchange where he hears the men directly call his dad a crook and saying he "got his, all right".

How could you not feel for Joe when he hears the shot that kills Gilford and reflects that his dad is dead and why did they have to kill the horse too. Hemingway has already told you in the story that his mother is dead. So you know that Joe is now all alone, except for he's with George who we also know has not-the-greatest moral character. It made me wonder what was next for Joe in his life and how would he turn out as a man.
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