Thread: True Crime
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Old 07-01-2012, 12:45 PM   #10
Catlady
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveEisenberg View Post
Read on your recommendation. Most of the way through I thought there was too much attention given to novels that ripped their plots out of Road Hill House murder newspaper stories, and not enough given to the real people involved.
I thought it was fascinating that the case had captured the popular imagination so much that it did become fodder for novels. My original intention was to read the novels, but I ended up reading only one, which was a disappointment (Norah Lofts, Out of the Dark--I already owned it in paperback).

Quote:
I guess I should read this one of these years, but isn't that untrue crime? According to Wikipedia, Capote interviewed people without tape recorder or taking notes. Then he produced copious direct quotations, in the book, that the subjects understandably deny having said.
I didn't know this--but I think I don't really care. It's a powerful and beautifully written book, and it certainly feels true in its essence.

(Why should I believe the subjects' denials? Presumably they didn't have tape recorders either!)
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