Thread: MobileRead July 2012 Book Club Nominations
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Old 06-20-2012, 02:39 AM   #3
issybird
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I'd like to nominate The Necropolis Railway, the first Jim Springer mystery by Andrew Martin. Here’s a blurb from Booklist:

Quote:
When this creepy-crawly suspense tale was originally published in the UK last year, the London Times called it "a classy potboiler . . . in the best traditions of Dickens and Collins (let alone Christie and Chandler)." There may be just a touch of hyperbole there, but the novel is certainly worthy of praise. The atmosphere is first-rate: Martin does a stunning job of bringing to life the era when steam locomotives chugged from London through the British countryside. And he intensifies by giving his hero, Jim Stringer, a job on one of those trains--not just any train but the one that carries bodies from London to burial on the city's outskirts. A refugee from the poverty of Yorkshire, Jim had been reduced to cleaning women's lavatories in railway stations before getting his big break and landing on the Necropolis Railway, where he endures hostile coworkers and working conditions only slightly better than those in the toilets. Even worse is his growing suspicion that a former worker may have met with foul play. The lurid tone and Jim's growing uneasiness lead to a supremely scary climax.
There’s a stellar review in the Guardian, but it’s too spoilery.

Many probably picked this up when it was free at Kobo about a week ago; it’s also only $2.90 for Kindle.

Last edited by issybird; 06-20-2012 at 02:41 AM.
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