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Old 06-12-2012, 11:36 PM   #9
charlesatan
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Join Date: May 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven Lake View Post
Has anyone done, or heard of someone who's done a kickstarter project for an upcoming book or novel? Any success, or is it really one of those things that's more trouble than it's worth?
I've seen it work. I've seen it fail.

The real question is: do you have a following and an asking price scaled to that level?

(There are also other details to handle, such as appropriate rewards, options, marketing, etc. but those won't help if you don't address the first point.)

Currently the most ambitious (in the sense that it's 12 books in 12 months... not the amount raised) is Matt Forbeck's 12 for '12: http://www.forbeck.com/12-for-12/

It bears mentioning that Forbeck has developed a following, whether it's gaming, fiction, or comics, and it's a relatively modest goal ($10,000 per trilogy).

The Order of the Stick comic Kickstarter (http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...-reprint-drive) was asking for around $60K and ended up being one of Kickstarter's top grossing Kickstarters for books, breaking the $1 Million mark. But then again, Rich Burlew has been nurturing the series for the past decade, and the comic has had a strong following (it helps that it's free). If Burlew's goal was $1 million to begin with, I doubt if it would have succeeded.

Mur Lafferty also had a Kickstarter for her books and quickly surpassed the $5K mark in a day or two, but she has a strong following in the podcast community.

If you're random indie author asking for $5K funding, why would your supporters fund you for that amount? ($1K seems more reasonable but you already need to have an audience.)

Suffice to say, it's a tool for those with an audience, rather than a means of acquiring one. (It can happen, such as when someone famous supports it like Neil Gaiman, but for the most part, it's more of maximizing the potential of your existing base rather than expanding it.)
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