View Single Post
Old 06-07-2012, 05:00 AM   #15
plib
Guru
plib ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.plib ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.plib ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.plib ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.plib ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.plib ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.plib ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.plib ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.plib ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.plib ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.plib ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
Posts: 777
Karma: 6356004
Join Date: Jan 2012
Device: Kobo Touch
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarryT View Post
I honestly don't see a problem with an employer doing background research using publicly available information before employing a person. It's a legitimate thing to do. There are many jobs for which an employer could have good reasons to conduct such background checks.
Do the research on the cases in question. This wasn't publicly available information.

Information on Facebook can be restricted from public availability, or limited to friends only. The employers wanted those individuals' personal logins and passwords to peruse information on their accounts that wasn't publicly available but only available to the account holder. You might think that's acceptable, several US jurisdictions don't. There are laws being passed to forbid it.

In the case of the device ID's none of that information is publicly available, unless there's a public database somewhere detailing all the numbers, names and addresses of the contacts on my phone, all the websites I visit, all the email accounts I use, where I bank, where I go in my car every day, where I spend my holidays?

Last edited by plib; 06-07-2012 at 05:07 AM.
plib is offline   Reply With Quote