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Old 05-28-2012, 08:19 AM   #22
Rob Lister
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VaporPunk View Post
This. Businesses have the right to sell what they want.



Not this.

Organized religions don't censor information? Or corporations? Any attempt to suppress information is censorship. That's different than deciding to sell or not sell a product that is available elsewhere.



Clear Channel didn't censor the Dixie Chicks? By deciding that they weren't "American" enough, weren't they imposing their values on others? Who are they to decide what people can listen to on the public airwaves?

When a corporation tries to block a story that may damage it in the public eye, isn't that censorship?
You're just going to have to find a better word that fits the act; 'censorship' isn't the right word. Choosing not to publish, support or host a work, no matter its form, is different than forbidding the work.

Clear Channel is a good example. They didn't stop the Dixie Chicks from singing, recording, or finding other venues. They simply stopped playing their music on their network. What gives them the right? The same thing that gives you the right to turn the channel when you hear something you don't like.

Last edited by Rob Lister; 05-28-2012 at 08:21 AM.
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