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Old 05-25-2012, 09:20 AM   #7
geekmaster
Всё гениальное просто.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaPePeR View Post
What is the problem with using the standard-touch-keyboard?
Why cant we just stick to this, so we don't have 5 different apps, that uses 5 different on-screen keyboards with 4 different layouts.

For me it looks like everyone is reinventing the wheel.
Well you might have your reasons to do so: but can you tell them?
I had a working touchscreen terminal using the "standard" keyboard LAYOUTS many months ago. It was so "linux-UNFRIENDLY" that I did not publish it. There are too many keyboard layouts to switch between, and most of them have two versions (press a key like "c" or "o" or "e" for two seconds to get the layout versions with the extra row of keys with accented characters. And even with all those keyboard layouts that require multiple "shift" keys to navigate, many important characters REQUIRED by linux are missing from them.

You cannot use the CODE that generates and manages those "standard" keyboard layouts in native-mode (compiled C) programs like these, because the built-in keyboard code is in the java framework and not available to native-mode programs. And as for just how "standard" those keyboard layouts are, just compare the K4 and K5 keyboard layouts -- they look and operate COMPLETELY DIFFERENTLY. To write a native-mode app that uses both sets of layouts, you would have to detect which kindle model your code was running on and then use a DIFFERENT set of keyboard layouts and code to drive them.

The unfinished terminal program that I work on when I have time uses a "REAL standard" keyboard layout commonly used on netbook computers. It does not need additional keyboard layouts for normal operation. I "blit" character images onto the keys so that I can support other keyboard layouts such as AZERTY or Cyrillic. I wish I had time to complete this, but I will have very little available time during the next two months.

Last edited by geekmaster; 05-25-2012 at 09:34 AM.
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