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Old 05-21-2012, 08:14 AM   #12
din155
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamlet53 View Post
So I will start with what I found the most annoying. Even in the most fantastic world created in a fantasy novel I expect it to have its own logic, a consistent set of rules. In my opinion this novel failed in the important matter of under what circumstances and to what extent the population of “London Below” can be seen and noticed by the population of the real present day London. When Jessica and Richard first encounter Door on the sidewalk they both immediately see and recognize her, completely at odds with the rules for to what extent real Londoners notice London Below people elsewhere in the novel. Obviously the novel goes no where but for this, but still here, and through out the novel, this crucial aspect changes arbitrarily as needed by Gaiman to further the story.......

.....So I enjoyed reading this, but it did not make me want to read more Gaiman, nor more fantasy novels.
Thanks for the review. I thought the inconsistencies were part of the story and some explanation will be there in the later part. For instance there was something in Jessica and Richard that caused them to see Door as they saw her. Unfortunately the explanation never came. Having said that, I really liked the book, using London history with the story was quite intriguing.
I had read American Gods by Gaiman before and it wasn’t exciting enough for me to get into his other works. Thankfully Neverwhere was a lighter read. A question to people who have read his other books, does Gaiman keeps bringing various mythological characters in his other stories as well?

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