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Old 05-06-2012, 01:49 PM   #28
EatingPie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Belfaborac View Post
Surely it makes little sense to label a book "Christian" simply because it lacks potentially offensive content? I'm not saying you're not right, it just seems to me that most publishers/book shops would realise they're turning away potential customers by doing so.
Actually, it's the opposite (of your last sentence! ).

Christian Fiction has become a large and popular genre, and is a big money maker. Labeling things as "Christian Fiction" draws an audience, rather than turns an audience away.

I do not read Christian Fiction per se, though I have a very liberal view of what constitutes "Christian." That said, I know that the genre runs the gamut of being as mundane as non-explicit Romance novels, to the highly "preachy" novels with blatant thematic intention.

In terms of prosthelytizing, I know a lot of people who read Christian Fiction, and my impression is that it's primarily for people who already accept the Christian worldview. The books are generally not written to "convert," but to inspire.

-Pie
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