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Old 04-24-2012, 03:35 PM   #13
JoeD
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Posts: 889
Karma: 4383958
Join Date: Nov 2007
Device: Hanlin v3, iPad, Kindle 4NT
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProfCrash View Post
Apprentice Alf stopped a while back. The scripts that are posted at that site are developed by others, many of whom post here. I believe that this is posted on the site but I cannot remember where.
I wasn't aware of that, but the point just shifts from A.Alf to the new developers who may one day give up. There may not always be someone willing to tackle the DRM. Of course chances are there will be, it only takes one after all, but it's better all around when there doesn't need to be.

Quote:
Removing the DRM is great, I like that. The only way it can hurt Amazon is if that means that other sites sell mobi books and at a cheaper price then Amazon. The reality is that most people are not going to take extra steps to convert even when they don't have to strip the DRM when they can buy it in the correct format.
Yep, if prices are similar, Amazon customers will likely keep buying from Amazon even if it's just a tad more since it saves hassle converting. If a book goes on sale at another retailer though, some will now buy/convert (or even not need to convert if the other retailer does epub and mobi).

Quote:
One possible downside for folks could be that Amazon decides to sell the EPub versions at a lower price and draws people from other e-readers to Amazon's store due to lower pricing.
Assuming they're not agency priced, yeah that could happen.

Amazon could try to sell to non-kindle owners and other stores could try to sell to kindle owners, that imo is a great thing for customers Hardware readers could also then be purchased because you like one more than the other rather than based on which store you've got to buy from (assuming you don't want to constantly free the books)

One thing it does for publishers is reduce the impact of Amazon turning around and saying agree to these terms or we're not selling your books. Since they'd still have a way to sell to kindle customers albeit with a minor extra side-load or email step. Not saying it eliminates the impact, it'd still be a big one for some time most likely, but it wouldn't be the end of the world for them.

Last edited by JoeD; 04-24-2012 at 03:38 PM.
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