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Old 04-06-2012, 01:59 AM   #9
Fozzybear
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Posts: 48
Karma: 45968
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: UK
Device: Kindle Keyboard 3G
I'm surprised by the second part of that chart (Sharing books with other people) - unless you're downloading public domain e-books (or habitually crack drm) and have lots of friends/family with e-readers I don't see how as many as 25% of respondents thought e-books were good for sharing. Maybe it's a different situation in the US somehow?

I don't see e-books supplanting paper books for the majority any time soon, the cost of an e-reader would easily pay for a couple of year's worth of books (especially those buying second-hand or from bargain booksellers) - most people I know see them as interesting gadgets but expensive and pointless. Not being able to share a book with friends is especially baffling to them - there's no perceived benefit from replacing perfectly serviceable paper for something that places limits on what you can do with books, requires care in use and power to work and may well die in a couple of years... requiring even more expense to replace it to access the books you have paid for. That e-books are often only a few pence cheaper than paper from the same seller and cannot be bought second-hand for low cost also is a big negative.

I enjoy reading free books on my kindle, it's a nice way to read, but I still don't see it as a practical replacement for the paper book and the majority of people are going to take a LOT of convincing. For one thing, drop a paper book or dunk it in the bath and you need to dry it out or worst case, buy another copy for a few pounds... do the same to an e-reader and you may need to pay ten times or more that amount to replace it. I just don't see how you convince people to make the change without physically removing availability of paper books to force them to do so unwillingly.

Last edited by Fozzybear; 04-06-2012 at 03:42 AM.
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