Thread: SSH Help
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Old 02-18-2012, 09:07 AM   #63
knc1
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Device: Too many.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjheiss View Post
What I meant with Telnet, was that when I entered "cd /mnt" it would work, but if I tried, say, "cd /mnt/us" it would complain that no such file or directory existed.

Now that I try it again, I get this:

Code:
[root@kindle /mnt]# ls
base-mmc  base-us   mmc       rwfs      us
[root@kindle /mnt]# cd /us
-sh: cd: can't cd to /us
Before it said that the directory /us/ doesn't exist, now it just says it can't cd to it.
Some general feedback first, then a more specific answer -

There are many good Linux Newbie sites on the net, one of them being:
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/

One thing to keep in mind when reading those sites, is that when dealing with a "Linux Powered Device" you are then dealing with something called: "Embedded Linux".

You will not find many web sites for "Embedded Linux Newbies" - embedded Linux isn't a newbie subject, not hardly.

Now the basics behind your posted confusion, this may help you past your current frustration point:

Linux uses a "Single Rooted" file system tree, rooted at the highest level directory seperator "/".
Operating systems based on Unix all have this sort of file system tree, not just Linux and Mac OSx.

Some other common operating systems use "Multiple Rooted" file system trees.
Those systems have a file system tree rooted at each storage device.
On those systems, a fully specified path includes the device name (that file system's root) as in C:, D:, E:, etc.

Likewise, on a single rooted system, a fully specified path includes the file system's root. In Linux, that file system root is written: / the same as a path seperator character.

So any time you enter a path that includes the root of the file system, the path is considered by the system as "absolute".

Any time you do not include the root of the file system in the path entered, the path is considered by the system as "relative to current location in the tree".

Where you are currently in the file system tree in a *nix system can be found with the:
pwd

The cd command works a bit differently between *nix systems and some other common systems.
In *nix, cd without any arguments changes the current directory to the "home" directory of the current user.
In some other common systems, cd without any arguments displays your current working directory.

This difference can get a user who isn't familar with the *nix behavior lost in the file tree in a hurry.

Now you should be able to navigate either type of file system if you know how to navigate in one of them.

Last edited by knc1; 02-18-2012 at 10:30 AM. Reason: corrections
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