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Old 01-29-2012, 02:22 AM   #10
dgatwood
Curmudgeon
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Posts: 248
Karma: 556004
Join Date: Jan 2012
Device: iPad, iPhone, Nook Simple Touch
By a curious coincidence, I'm about to return a Kindle Touch because of the answer to your initial question about JavaScript events....

As far as I can tell, Kindle's experimental browser does not support any touch events. It also does not support mouseup/mousedown correctly. If you tap something, it sends mousedown, mouseup, and click. If you touch and hold, it doesn't send any events at all. I doubt it supports mousemove, but even if it did, it wouldn't be particularly useful without a working mousedown/mouseup or touchstart/touchend.

Also, it has about a two second click latency. When you click a link, it takes about two seconds for JavaScript to start running or for the new page to start loading. This applies to even the simplest content, e.g. <div onclick="alert('Yo.');">Click me</div>.

Also, it does not support the viewport meta tag. Combine that with the lack of touch events, and there's no way to prevent double-tap scrolling.

There's also no way to scroll the browser chrome off the screen, which is only problematic because it takes up about 13% of the screen real estate (most of which is the location bar).

Finally, CSS transforms are a little buggy; scaling in particular tends to result in content disappearing rather than getting lighter, presumably because of poor anti-aliasing support in their display code.

In short, although the browser does a fairly good job at rendering (I think it is based on WebKit), it does a terrible job at doing just about anything with the slightest bit of interaction.


Kindle Touch results from my test tool (http://www.gatwood.net/runtests.html):

onclick: pass
onmousedown: fail
ontouchstart: fail
latency: 2.4 seconds

*shivers*
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