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Old 05-14-2008, 12:37 PM   #1
astrodad
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Discuss: The Gods Themselves by Isaac Asimov

Let's talk about the book, "The God's Themselves" by Isaac Asimov.

WARNING: THERE MAY BE SPOILERS IN THIS DISCUSSION!!


Wikipedia Entry for this book


Summary: The Gods Themselves is a 1972 science fiction novel written by Isaac Asimov. It won the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1972 and the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1973.

I am in no way qualified to write up a book review on this book, but having just finished it, I wanted to offer up my opinions, likes, and dislikes of the book.

Overall, it was highly enjoyable. I read it through in about three days on my Sony Reader.

I enjoyed the dialogue of the characters. As always with Isaac Asimov's work there is a tendency for the characters' personalities to mesh and become indistinguishable, particularly during long dialogue sequences. Sometimes this is a problem, but with this book, the characters were all so wonderful that it didn't really matter to me.

As for the premise of the story, I found it fascinating, though I admit that I lack enough scientific study to determine any flaws in the logic of the Electron Pump.

I picked up the book because it was on a "First Contact" list on this forum, but for me, it doesn't really fit the model for a first contact story. There is only minimal interaction between our universe and that of the Para-Universe.

I have only a few gripes and/or questions about the plot:

1. There was no conclusion of the story of the para-characters. What happened with Estwald?

2. Asimov invested an enormous amount of time with Lamont, that I felt cheated at the end of the story. It would have been nice to see him again, to see his reactions to the discovery and acceptance of the flaw in the Pump.

3. There were times when the dialogue was simply unbelievable, in the sense that the characters used words and phrases no human would utter. One that struck me in particular was when Selene was discussing the different basic forces in the universe and she starts rattling off ratios of intensity. He portrays her as an Intuitionist, but this sequence is really off-character. This happens too much to not be noticeable.

I really enjoyed the way he brought back Ben Denison and I'm also glad he was the one that brought about the discovery of the flaw of the Electron Pump.

In a way, the trio of Denison, Selene, and Lamont was a parallel to the triad family of Odeen, Dua, and Tritt. The rational mind of Denison is comparable to the likeness of Odeen, Dua and Selent are both "feelers" (Dua an Emotional and Selene an Intuitionist), and Lamont acted like a much more flamboyant and hot tempered version of Tritt.

It was a great read, and I picked up a few new vocabulary words (to my wife's dismay).

Overall I would highly recommend this book to anyone.

What did you think of the book? Let us know!

Last edited by astrodad; 05-14-2008 at 01:58 PM.
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