View Single Post
Old 11-08-2011, 03:01 PM   #5
chaley
"chaley", not "charley"
chaley ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.chaley ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.chaley ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.chaley ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.chaley ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.chaley ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.chaley ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.chaley ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.chaley ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.chaley ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.chaley ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
Posts: 5,388
Karma: 821638
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: France
Device: Many android devices
I understand what you want to do, and I think I answered the question on your other post. I am not totally convinced that the behavior you want is correct, but I am willing to go along with it. Reason for doubt: looking at a subset of the information does not always mean that it should sort that way. For example, consider a net-worth column. Should it sort by pennies because that is what I am looking at, or should it respect the 'real' net worth? Arguments exist on both sides.

Also, sorting the {date} column does sort as a date-time. The parts that are not shown are set to some default, which depending on the template may cause the sort to behave as you want.

As I said, I am willing to go with the 'sort by what I see' position if Kovid is. Repeating that other post here for completeness: I have an implementation that sorts dates as displayed. The performance penalty is not huge. For a 20,000 book library, the time to sort by a date column went from approximately 1/2 second to 1 second, or some 500 microseconds per book. This is consistent with my mark 1 eyeball estimate of the cost of trimming the date.

[...]

One note: the sort will respect strange display templates and do something. If your display template is, for example yyyy/ss, then the month, day, hour, and minute will be filled in with a constant. The results could easily not be what you expect. Continuing the example, 2011/10/25 19:08:10 and 2011/01/19 10:10:10 will sort as equal because the years (2011) and the seconds (10) match.
chaley is offline   Reply With Quote