View Single Post
Old 10-25-2011, 02:37 PM   #10
fantasyfan
Guru
fantasyfan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.fantasyfan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.fantasyfan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.fantasyfan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.fantasyfan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.fantasyfan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.fantasyfan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.fantasyfan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.fantasyfan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.fantasyfan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.fantasyfan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
fantasyfan's Avatar
 
Posts: 811
Karma: 8177718
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ireland
Device: Kindle Paperwhite 2G Wi-Fi only, iPad, iPod Touch 3G, iPad Air
Unfortunately, I found it quite difficult to relate very much to this play. Peer himself is a very Loki-like character. Like Loki he is the ultimate selfish trickster, but whereas Loki in Norse Mythology is seen as ultimately an evil character, taking sides against the gods, Peer is {perhaps} redeemed by Solviegís love. But why Solvieg loves him is a complete mystery to me.

I felt as Hamlet did, that Ibsen was deconstructing the traditional morality of the Norse Myth. Thus, there is no psychological or moral Ragnarok equivalent for Peer. The ending is indeed ambiguous and no doubt Ibsen purposely created this ambiguity to play against the simplistic heroic answers of the great Sagas.

But in the end, I just wasnít moved by this play and my final reaction was very similar to Issybirdís. However, Sun surferís very impressive review would indicate that Iím missing something. I should probably re-read the play with those insights in mind.
fantasyfan is offline   Reply With Quote