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Old 10-09-2011, 09:22 AM   #10
frahse
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Over in the "The Price of Exclusivity" similar ideas are being brought out. Essentially not wanting to allow an author/owner of a product to have an exclusive deal with a Seller.

Basically some people are preaching that ownership is not in the interest of humanity. This is certainly not unusual or new.

We can go back a bit: (Wikipedia)
French communist Morelly,[4] who proposed in his 1755 Code of Nature "Sacred and Fundamental Laws that would tear out the roots of vice and of all the evils of a society" including
I. Nothing in society will belong to anyone, either as a personal possession or as capital goods, except the things for which the person has immediate use, for either his needs, his pleasures, or his daily work.
II. Every citizen will be a public man, sustained by, supported by, and occupied at the public expense.
III. Every citizen will make his particular contribution to the activities of the community according to his capacity, his talent and his age; it is on this basis that his duties will be determined, in conformity with the distributive laws.[5]

Later Karl Marx popularized it:
From each according to his ability, to each according to his need (or needs) is a slogan popularised by Karl Marx in his 1875 Critique of the Gotha Program.[1

These kinds of thinkers believed that man would produce, work, develop, invent and persevere for the "common good."
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