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Old 10-05-2011, 12:11 AM   #1
ATDrake
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Free book (Copia ADE-ePub) Pride & Prejudice Annotated Edition [Classics]

Pride & Prejudice by Jane Austen, is available free in a new annotated edition with full-length margin notes/commentary by noted Austen scholar and University of Virginia professor of English Susan Fraiman.

Apparently this is an ADE-ePub version which you will need to browse in the special Copia Reader app (available for desktop and tablets) to see the full notes. Presumably it'll just work as an ordinary edition of P&P if you load it up on your regular reader, but hopefully a nicely proofread and formatted one.

Anyway, if you're interested, here's the page for it on Copia's website and they've apparently also some free football guide by a known sportswriter as well, and have apparently replaced some of their older PDF former freebies with ePub copies.

Description (I skipped the P&P regular intro blurb; I figure you all know what the story's about already)
This Copia Edition of Pride and Prejudice is fully annotated by Susan Fraiman, professor of English at the University of Virginia and noted Austen scholar. Using the Copia eReader, Austen fans can read Fraiman's lively and illuminating notes right in the margins of the book.

Ever wonder what shoe roses are? How to tell a phaeton from a barouche? Would you like to know why Austen's opening sentence is so famous? Why Lydia Bennet is key to the conclusion? Well-versed in the debates that animate critics, familiar with the issues that fascinate students, Fraiman takes up all these questions and more with insight, clarity, and humor.

This edition will appeal to those already on a first-name basis with Jane as well as to those just getting to know her, and is ideal for book clubs, classrooms, and inquiring readers everywhere.
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