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Old 05-09-2005, 06:15 PM   #2
hacker
Technology Mercenary
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Posts: 614
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Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: New London, CT
Device: Direct Neural Implant
Quote:
Originally Posted by Morpheus
Carnegie Mellon University is conducting an experiment at The Ellis School and one of CMU's own classes in which traditional textbooks are replaced with HP 1100 Tablet PCs (starting price: $1,599).
This reminds me of how Microsoft was trying to "encourage underpriviledged education" by giving hundreds of computers to villages in Africa, but their contract specifically denied any non-Microsoft products from running on those machines. Curious that you're trying to educate people, but only letting them learn one way of doing things... the Microsoft way.
"...the first crack rock is free, and its all you'll need."
Seriously though, there's a major problem with replacing "books" with tablets (and Star Trek got it right here with their PADD devices): Books are read up and down, left to right (left page, right page, flip, left page, right page, etc.) Most of the "ebook" material I've seen represented on tablet devices is always one long monolithic "webpage" format. That's very hard to read and compare page to page.

If it isn't side-by-side (and studies have shown this is the best way to read, comprehend and retain information), then it will get lost, and we'll end up breeding children with huge ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) problems, who are just "skimming" the material because they can go back later and Google it. Why remember something you can just recall on your cellphone in seconds?

This is a HUGE problem.

Quote:
Google could also lead into temptation, right? What's your next excuse when you fail to deliver your paper on time? "Sorry Professor Saltzberg, but I couldn't study the text sources because Google was down yesterday."
Plagarism is a huge, growing problem. There are developers out there writing software to find people who directly plagarize articles, stories, research. With the proliferation of blogs, its even harder to verify a first-level resource for research. How do you know something is "true" if 10 people all say the same thing (and 9 of them copied from one of the others)?
"Stealing the work of one is 'plagarism'. Stealing the work of many is 'research'"
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