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Old 04-27-2008, 09:56 PM   #19
montsnmags
Grand Sorcerer
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Join Date: Nov 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taylor514ce View Post
I was remiss when I posted my books in discussing the "why" aspect. For the Rinker Buck and Oliver Sacks books, they both manage to recapture the childhood state, which is simultaneously magical, mythical, and vividly, directly "real". I think it is extremely important for adults, as cliché as it may be to say it, to see the world through child's eyes. ...
I hope you'll forgive me for bringing J.K.Rowling into the subject, and making comparisons to Oliver Sacks, however in the case of her Harry Potter books I personally believe your comment regarding a "child's eyes" is the actual answer to the question of her popularity with adults as well. For all the criticism some people (including myself) might wish to offer the Harry Potter books (and this is not the place to elaborate on it), I believe this is at the crux of their popularity amongst children and adults.

I think that people make a mistake when they say that the adult popularity is because "she is writing for adults too". Rather, I think that she is seeing an alternate "world through a child's eyes" and that adults are either unnecessarily defending their reading of a "kids' book" or not realising that they still always retain the ability to see through the eyes of their own childhood. That's a Good Thing.

As for Oliver Sacks...I'll shamefacedly offer that he has been a writer on my TBR-list for many years, and yet I have managed to not get to him at all so far. I'll be sure to amend that, my surety emphasised by your comments.

Cheers,
Marc
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