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Old 08-24-2011, 05:15 PM   #26
beppe
Grand Sorcerer
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Posts: 5,161
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Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Italy
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I nominate The Occult Philosophy in the Elizabethan Age by Frances Yates.

It is a while that I am reading by Frances Yates the Art of Memory, that I would have happily nominated, but there is no clean ebook that I know. so much knowledge of our past, so many occasions to learn, to deviate toward unexpected marvels. (I got a PDF somehow, somewhere).
Here is the description of the book I am nominating.

Spoiler:
The Occult Philosophy in the Elizabethan Age by Frances Yates

(6 reviews at Amazon.com)
Subjects: Education, Philosophy, Teaching Methods & Materials, Occult Sciences
Description: 'Among those who have explored the intellectual world of the sixteenth century, no one can rival Frances Yates. Wherever she looks, she illuminates . . . No one has done more than she to recreate, from unexpected material, the intellectual life of past ages.' – Hugh Trevor-Roper 'A welcome new edition of this classic work ...' – Network It is hard to overestimate the importance of the contribution made by Dame Frances Yates to the serious study of esotericism and the occult sciences. To her work can be attributed the contemporary understanding of the occult origins of much of western scientific thinking, indeed of western civilization itself. The Occult Philosophy of the Elizabethan Age was her last book, and in it she condensed many aspects of her wide learning to present a clear, penetrating, and, above all, accessible survey of the occult movements of the Renaissance, highlighting the work of John Dee, Giordano Bruno, and other key esoteric figures. The book is invaluable in illuminating the relationship between occultism and Renaissance thought, which in turn had a profound impact on the rise of science in the seventeenth century. Stunningly written and highly engaging, Yates' masterpiece is a must-read for anyone interested in the occult tradition. (from Amazon.com) less

Last edited by beppe; 08-24-2011 at 05:18 PM.
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