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Old 07-25-2011, 09:23 PM   #3
beppe
Grand Sorcerer
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Posts: 5,161
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Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Italy
Device: Kindle3, Ipod4, IPad2
I got it. I have chosen. I chose it because, although I have read it, it was many years ago and I just remember the fundamental keys. I could have chosen a book by dame Byatt, like the one I am reading now, but that would have been an easy way out, and I want to read something that I do not remember almost at all. I thought of some Italians (there are good ones) but none in ebooks that I like to read or to reread. There is Iliad by Baricco, but I do not think it ideal for our book club. Also Silk by the same guy, but it is too thin, maybe.

Forster makes a very pleasant reading. He stimulates thoughts and interest but he does it lightly, with subtle elegance. He is old fashioned and has sympathy for his characters, which is a nice change.
The lesson is very actual.

E.M. Forster's classic novel "A Passage to India". Available as ebook (f.i. Amazon sells it for mere $ 2.99).

The book presentation
Forster's 1924 masterpiece, A Passage to India, is a novel about preconceptions and misconceptions and the desire to overcome the barrier that divides East and West in colonial India. It shows the limits of liberal tolerance, good intentions, and good will in sorting out the common problems that exist between two very different cultures. Forster's famous phrase, "only connect," stresses the need for human beings to overcome their hesitancy and prejudices and work towards realizing affection and tolerance in their relations with others. But when he turned to colonial India, where the English and the Indians stare at each other across a cultural divide and a history of imbalanced power relations, mutual suspicion, and ill will, Forster wonders whether connection is even possible.
...
Forster's keen eye for social nuance and his capacious sympathy for his characters make A Passage to India not only a balanced investigation of the rift that divides English and Indian but also a convincing and moving work of art. Written in 1924, two years after the publication of Eliot's The Waste Land and Joyce's Ulysses and one year before Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, Forster's masterpiece was produced during one of the most remarkable periods of achievement in English literature since Wordsworth's days.
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