View Single Post
Old 07-25-2011, 03:34 PM   #34
khmann
Enthusiast
khmann once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.khmann once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.khmann once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.khmann once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.khmann once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.khmann once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.khmann once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.khmann once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.khmann once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.khmann once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.khmann once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.
 
Posts: 43
Karma: 1658
Join Date: Jul 2011
Device: b006
Quote:
Originally Posted by mobad View Post
By the way, the reason that your script worked so well with timing was because it's running as fast as the Kindle can run it which will drain the battery and slow things down.
I respectfully disagree... the script blocks on reading from the pipe when it is empty, confirmed by top. I am happy that you've taken the concept and made it more functional.

To summarize for others hacking at this, there seem to be 3 different trade-offs between speed and quality/effect. I maintain that waiting for the kernel to tell us when it has been requested to update a page is a more reliable, quicker option, but keyinput detection is almost certainly still required to deal with the artificats the menus cause.

I think the "next level" in hacking all of this would be to somehow bypass the kindle doing any kind of refresh on its own, and build our own transition/refresh image - like the eink hardware invert-flash, but subtler, and more intelligent, draw that, and then put up the regular page. Perhaps changing the "power level" of the panel to "sleep", convincing the eink that the page was full black (even though it never updated), and then letting it over-clear the display (all actions on eink seem relative anyway).

anyway, mad props to everyone here; Amazon will probably implement something along these lines in k4 if for no other reason that Nook uses it as a marketing ploy. I think I actually prefer it to flash every time than just once every 6 pages because I get used to it.

If Amazon does bring something like this to future products, it would be really cool if they back-port this feature... seems like there is no hardware reason it can't be done. And for them to show a willingness to support their older products would improve their image in my mind - nobody likes to buy a product that will be abandoned when the new model is released.
khmann is offline   Reply With Quote