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Old 06-02-2011, 05:03 PM   #9604
ATDrake
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Join Date: Mar 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phenomshel View Post
I have hied myself to Amazon and purchased the required book, LOL. I'll probably end up having to get the other two, as well, knowing myself and my OCD'ness about incomplete series.
Soon to be a 4th, since apparently the revival of the series has been popular enough that the new publisher is doing at least up to a 5th book.

I get them in hardcover myself, but they're cheapest at Kobo with discount coupons and Severn House has been pretty good about doing e-editions of Hambly's latest with only a couple of months' delay from the HC release.

Anyway, to make up for making you buy a new book and thereby its entire accompanying series, there were a number of freebie cozy/comedy/amateur sleuth mysteries that came free yesterday. If you frequent the Deals forum, you may have already seen them, but just in case:

June Bug by Jess Loury (1st in Murder-By-Month)[/URL]
I Spy by Kate Johnson (1st in Sophie Green Mysteries)
In the Belly of Jonah and Lot's Return to Sodom by Sandra Brennan (1st and 2nd in Liv Bergen mystery/thrillers)

It does nothing for the state of your TBR mountain, but at least your wallet will be a little happier? Though probably not if you end up picking the rest of those series, as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by phenomshel View Post
Having already read Ghastly Glass, all I can tell you is beware of insecurity. It abounds in that one...
Yeah, I noticed. I'm wondering if there's some sort of 7 Stages of Romantic Whateverness like there is for grief and such.

So far the star couple has been through
  1. Constant Petty Bickering Due to Unresolved Sexual Tension and have moved on to
  2. Contrived Misunderstandings That Conveniently Showcase Exactly How Attractive Each Member of the Couple is to the Opposite Sex and Reinforce the Existing Relationship By Resorting to Jealous Clinginess.
Anyway, just finished Jim and Joyce Lavene's 2nd book in what turns out to actually be called the "Renaissance Faire" mysteries, in which once again ex-academic amateur sleuth and craft apprentice Jessie Morton takes on a new craft apprenticeship at the year-round Renfaire tourist village, which is now having its highly out-of-period Hallowe'en season with costumed werewolves and such.

Well, I'm not reading these things for historical accuracy anyway. Or for the relationship drama, either, which leads me to think once the main plot is underway, "Well, no wonder someone's apparently trying to kill you. If I had to stand and watch your repeated snipe-then-smooching all day, then I'd be tempted to make with the stabbity, too!"

And then I remember that I actually am sitting and watching their repeated snipe-then-smooching. And then I wonder exactly how one would go about stabbing fictional characters, if one were so inclined. Probably with one of those fictionalizer book-contents-visiting machines like in Futurama.

Mind you, I think in part it can be chalked up to the fact that the leads clearly have an unequal relationship. After all, one of them is a promising young person with a decent career behind them and a maybe-bright future ahead, and the other is a lawyer named for a merged banking megacorp.

Maybe traditional naming practices in the US mean that the latter is actually a perfectly suitable moniker for loving parents to inflict upon their child, but I know that if I were to spend a season working at the replica Viking tourist village over at L'Anse aux Meadows and happened to meet an attractive person of any gender who was named something similar, like, say, Toronto Dominion, even if he/she/it were an academic redhead, I would be too busy trying to suppress uncontrollable snickering to get anywhere near the smooching stage.

Anyway, aside from the relationship drama and the amateur sleuth's personal issues, which I could have cheerfully skipped, this was an okay book with good glimpses into the craft being ostensibly studied and a decent whodunnit with multiple suspects and a reasonable resolution.

A bit better than the last one, but still some rather ridiculous elements, though a little less over-the-top than last time. And I did like the faux-newsletter of Renaissance-ish activities and customs in the back.

Can't really recommend unless you've got a high tolerance for silliness and really like looking at dysfunctional historical recreation performance projects and the dysfunctional persons who recreate them while projecting their personal issues, but I liked this enough that I'm willing to seek out the next book from the library, even if I personally wouldn't shell more than about $2.50 out of pocket for a copy and only then if I were feeling very generous.
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