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Old 05-28-2011, 08:28 PM   #34
taosaur
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I can't recommend Terry Brooks in general, but his Genesis of Shannara series, beginning with Armageddon's Children, was a fairly original fantasy/post-apocalypse/contemporary mash-up. You don't need to be familiar with the Shannara books, but the first one was basically as blatant a Tolkien knock-off as one could produce without simply re-typing the text, with the exception that the medieval setting, complete with dwarves, gnomes, trolls and elves, was said to have come about as the result of a Great War fought with technologies that wiped out nearly all life and reshaped the land.

Genesis of Shannara, as you would likely guess, is the story of the apocalypse that turned our world into Middle Earth. It's set 2-3 generations after the fall of civilization, which started in the '90s, apparently There's still some advanced technology sitting around, but most people (and other things) are living on a tribal level, or in armed compounds. If you don't mind some elves and demons getting up in there with your robots, zombies and lizard people, it's a fun ride.

For this series and the preceding Word & Void, he's borrowing heavily from Christian mythology without referencing it explicitly, but not such that I, as a non-Christian, found it remotely preachy, and probably not in a way that would offend most Christians, either. Like pretty much all of Brooks' work I've read, I wouldn't pigeonhole it as YA, but it is predominantly PG-13.
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