View Single Post
Old 05-27-2011, 02:21 PM   #10
crich70
Grand Sorcerer
crich70 ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crich70 ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crich70 ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crich70 ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crich70 ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crich70 ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crich70 ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crich70 ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crich70 ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crich70 ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crich70 ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
crich70's Avatar
 
Posts: 6,632
Karma: 21805335
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Monroe Wisconsin
Device: K3, Kindle Paperwhite, Calibre, and Mobipocket for Pc (netbook)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Ashling View Post
I didn't say the question as strange. I said I found it strange. Then I explained why.

That being said, I'm aware of all the examples you give, but it's just not how I write. As I explained in my previous post I began a story which I thought could be told in about 60-70k words. It ended up a trilogy of 400k+ words, and I'm writing a sequel now. I just go with the flow. As such I don't find any length of story more difficult than the other. When you're done, you're done, but not sooner or later. It takes what it takes, but not less or more.

Put in another way: I don't think length should be a primary concern. The story should be, and what length it needs.

If pressed however, I would say the micro short story is the most difficult. You probably know this one by Hemingway:



He reckoned it was his best piece of writing. I tend to agree.
Touche. Hemingway was a master of the written word. There is also the world's shortest horror story (I forget who wrote it).

'The last man on earth sat at his table. There was a knock at the door.'
crich70 is offline   Reply With Quote