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Old 05-12-2011, 04:56 PM   #9359
ATDrake
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BearMountainBooks View Post
Oh, you do not! It's pretty obvious in a couple of places!!!!! I thought that was so fun!
Well, if they're sprinkled throughout, I think I may have just run into one of them. I just finished The Mummy's Case, and one of the suspects for the "Master Criminal" who's been stealing antiquities is a young man of a particular colouring and build from an apparently upper-class background who tends to run away at the prospect of physical violence, who's rather similar to an established character who steals antiquities and is a young man of a particular colouring and build from an apparently upper-class background who tends to run away at the prospect of physical violence.

Ancestor or red herring, who knows?

Before that, also read the 3rd Vicky Bliss Silhouette in Scarlet, which I rather liked because it's a) set in Sweden and I have this inordinate fondness for cultures which produce dragon boats and b) practically a non-murder mystery heist caper in which no dead bodies are stumbled across to provide extra drama. I like that for a change of pace.

I'd gotten a bunch of assorted Bliss and Peabody mysteries out from the library, which seems to have the lot along with some more obscure non-series Elizabeth Peters mysteries (even if I had to dig in the surprisingly well-stocked Large Print section for some of the older ones; who knew that people with vision difficulties loved their lurid mystery/crime thrillers that much?) with the intention of seeing how many I could read in order until I hit a gap.

I'd been intending to alternate between Bliss and Peabody volumes so as not to burn out on them, but then I went and read The Curse of the Pharoahs and The Mummy Case in short succession.

You know, I don't mind if there are inordinately precocious children showing up in adult-level books. I don't even mind really all that much if they're inordinately precocious children upon whom their parents dote and never really restrain who wreak destructive havoc upon their surroundings and make extra work for their actual put-upon caretakers who have to both tidy up after them and answer to the parents when the kids disappear off onto another adventure.

I'm willing to say that I can even tolerate it when said inordinately precocious children upon whom their parents dote and never really restrain end up wreaking destructive havoc which conveniently saves the day on a number of occasions, and helpfully turn up the answers which have evaded the silly adults who have foolishly been ignoring this inordinately precocious savant of a child. Although I prefer that to happen in YA/kids' books where it reads more naturally as a wish-fulfillment fantasy.

But I cannot even in the least put up with any child, no matter how precocious and day-saving and savant-like, who employs an adowable lithping speech defect to emphasize their adowable pwecocity.

It is at that point where I begin to believe not in the Victorian notion that "children should be seen and not heard" since technically that's all the appearance they're making in a print novel, but rather the notion that "children with twee speech defects should be packed off post-haste to the faraway boarding school and not be seen or heard from again until they are fully grown and the twee speech defect has been beaten out of them".

It's probably too much to hope for that they start leaving him at home during the digs.

Anyway, usual recommend for Silhouette in Scarlet if you like nice "To Catch a Thief"-like how-to-foil-the-heist-caper mysteries.

Very, very, mild recommend for The Curse of the Pharoahs and The Mummy Case if you enjoy Plucky Victorian Egyptologist murder mysteries.

Actually, since there appear to be nearly 2 dozen of the Peabody books, I think I'd skip TMC unless determined to read the series in order. You can always go back and read it later, after reading the ones where the kid is apparently grown and maybe childhood scrapes will seem more entertaining in retrospect.

TCotP had only a minor appearance and was fairly fun in other respects, although the copy I read came with additional commentary in the form of a previous Gentle Reader who left inane remarks written in pen, along with the occasional typo correction.

I think I might as well read Lion in the Valley next, since that seems to continue the "Master Criminal" plotline and it's a lightweight paperback and it's a nice, sunny day and I don't have to worry about it getting rained up on while waiting for the bus.

But after that I'm definitely cleansing my palate with Trojan Gold in the Bliss series.

Last edited by ATDrake; 05-12-2011 at 05:08 PM. Reason: Fix title and omitted letters which change the meaning of a word.
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