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Old 05-05-2011, 04:54 PM   #47
beppe
Grand Sorcerer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TGS View Post
Strange about Blood Meridian, I am a native English speaker and I seem to be reading it very slowly too, (and there is nothing wrong with your English that I can see!). It's not a criticism but I wonder whether it is to do with the style of narration and the "difficulty" of forming representations of what is being read.
I admire McCarthy, I have read the trilogy (All the pretty horses, The Crossing, Cities of the Plain), I keep the Road on hold as it is so good that i do not want to waste it and i keep on hold No Country for the same reason. I was alittle repulsed by Blood Meridian as I thought it would have been very dark and full of injustice and sufference, that is not missing in the trilogy but at least is mixed with more sunny narrative episodes.

The trilogy is full of hard text blocks, when McCarthy explains his philosophy about life, usually through the words of some strange shaman or gipsy or lod man of the mountain. Those I skip at every rereading .

Quote:
Originally Posted by TGS View Post
I recently wrote my MA thesis on the cognitive processes that might contribute to the reader's construction of a representation of a narrative - the text being seen as something analogous to a "diagram" for such a construction. One of the issues I didn't tackle but I think is really interesting is why we, some of us anyway, actually prefer texts in which the construction of such a representation is both facilitated and, at the same time, blocked or interrupted by the text. We like to have some imaginative work to do and often feel that texts that do not require such work of us are of less literary merit.
Are we talking of the same text blocks? A master in describing without saying is E.M Forster.
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