View Single Post
Old 02-07-2008, 10:10 AM   #5
Steven Lyle Jordan
Grand Sorcerer
Steven Lyle Jordan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lyle Jordan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lyle Jordan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lyle Jordan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lyle Jordan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lyle Jordan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lyle Jordan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lyle Jordan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lyle Jordan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lyle Jordan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lyle Jordan ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
Steven Lyle Jordan's Avatar
 
Posts: 8,482
Karma: 5171130
Join Date: Jan 2006
Device: none
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarryT View Post
Who can stand in the presidential elections, Steve? What I mean is, what would you have to do in order to get your name on the ballot paper in November as an "independent" candidate?
The only absolute requirements to be a U.S. President are:
  • age 35 or older;
  • natural-born citizen of the U.S.;
  • resident in U.S. for 14 years or longer.

To become a candidate, you have to petition each state to be put on their presidential ballot. Each state has different petitioning requirements. You don't have to be on every state's ballot to run, but obviously you have to be on enough states' ballots to potentially garner enough votes to win. From Yahoo:

Quote:
According to Richard Winger, publisher of the nonpartisan Ballot Access News, such a candidate may have to gather as many as 750,000 signatures and fork over filing fees of $8,100 to get on the presidential ballot in all 50 states. Even for a motivated and organized candidate, these requirements are daunting. For example, in the 2000 presidential election, the high-profile Green Party candidate, Ralph Nader, didn't make it onto the ballot in three states.
(And don't get me started on the Electoral College...)

Also from Yahoo:

Quote:
Many, but not all, states allow voters to write in a candidate's name on the ballot itself. States may limit this to just the primaries or open it to the general election. The write-in candidates are often required to register in advance and pay the same filing fees as other candidates.
Now that primaries have started, it may be too late in the year to get onto the 2008 election ballots.

Last edited by Steven Lyle Jordan; 02-07-2008 at 10:12 AM.
Steven Lyle Jordan is offline   Reply With Quote