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Old 03-23-2011, 11:32 AM   #10
WT Sharpe
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Here is the most telling passage on religion that I found in the work, showing plainly that Franklin was, indeed, a Deist:

Spoiler:
.....Before I enter upon my public appearance in business, it may be well to let you know the then state of my mind with regard to my principles and morals, that you may see how far those influenc'd the future events of my life. My parents had early given me religious impressions, and brought me through my childhood piously in the Dissenting way. But I was scarce fifteen, when, after doubting by turns of several points, as I found them disputed in the different books I read, I began to doubt of Revelation itself. Some books against Deism fell into my hands; they were said to be the substance of sermons preached at Boyle's Lectures. It happened that they wrought an effect on me quite contrary to what was intended by them; for the arguments of the Deists, which were quoted to be refuted, appeared to me much stronger than the refutations; in short, I soon became a thorough Deist. My arguments perverted some others, particularly Collins and Ralph; but, each of them having afterwards wrong'd me greatly without the least compunction, and recollecting Keith's conduct towards me (who was another freethinker), and my own towards Vernon and Miss Read, which at times gave me great trouble, I began to suspect that this doctrine, tho' it might be true, was not very useful. My London pamphlet, which had for its motto these lines of Dryden:

.........."Whatever is, is right. Though purblind man Sees but a part o' the chain, the nearest link: His eyes not carrying to the equal beam, That poises all above;"

and from the attributes of God, his infinite wisdom, goodness and power, concluded that nothing could possibly be wrong in the world, and that vice and virtue were empty distinctions, no such things existing, appear'd now not so clever a performance as I once thought it; and I doubted whether some error had not insinuated itself unperceiv'd into my argument, so as to infect all that follow'd, as is common in metaphysical reasonings.
.....I grew convinc'd that truth, sincerity and integrity in dealings between man and man were of the utmost importance to the felicity of life; and I form'd written resolutions, which still remain in my journal book, to practice them ever while I lived. Revelation had indeed no weight with me, as such; but I entertain'd an opinion that, though certain actions might not be bad because they were forbidden by it, or good because it commanded them, yet probably these actions might be forbidden because they were bad for us, or commanded because they were beneficial to us, in their own natures, all the circumstances of things considered. And this persuasion, with the kind hand of Providence, or some guardian angel, or accidental favorable circumstances and situations, or all together, preserved me, thro' this dangerous time of youth, and the hazardous situations I was sometimes in among strangers, remote from the eye and advice of my father, without any willful gross immorality or injustice, that might have been expected from my want of religion.


His thirteen virtues (I suspect he allowed a broad interpretation of #12):

Spoiler:
.....I included under thirteen names of virtues all that at that time occurr'd to me as necessary or desirable, and annexed to each a short precept, which fully express'd the extent I gave to its meaning.
.....These names of virtues, with their precepts, were:
..... 1. TEMPERANCE. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation.
..... 2. SILENCE. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation.
..... 3. ORDER. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time.
..... 4. RESOLUTION. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve.
..... 5. FRUGALITY. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing.
..... 6. INDUSTRY. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions.
..... 7. SINCERITY. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly.
..... 8. JUSTICE. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty.
..... 9. MODERATION. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve.
..... 10. CLEANLINESS. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation.
..... 11. TRANQUILLITY. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable.
..... 12. CHASTITY. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation.
..... 13. HUMILITY. Imitate Jesus and Socrates.

Last edited by WT Sharpe; 03-23-2011 at 11:34 AM.
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