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Old 03-07-2011, 12:27 AM   #8540
ATDrake
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Posts: 6,373
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Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Roundworld
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaBookGuy View Post
I read the penultimate one recently (Poison Ivory); Abby herself I could deal with, but her assistant C. J. was every bit as insufferable as I'd remembered with her "Shelby" stories.
I kind of had the opposite reaction. CJ was so over-the-top unbelievable that whatever she said or did no longer really touched me and began to look mildly funny in a non-sequitur Foul Ole Ron millenium-hand-and-shrimp-ptui* way, but since Abby was narrator and both judgmental and somewhat incompetent, her viewpoint started to seriously grate.

Mind you, I seem to have read two books from the mid-point of the series and maybe one of the characters gets worse and the other gets better later on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by phenomshel View Post
I was about to say, she must be hitting a note with someone, because they're selling A. Well enough for the libraries to buy them, and with these budget cuts they don't buy just everything anymore, and B. well enough for the publishers not to be dropping them.
Yeah, obviously someone loves them, judging by how many of the things made it into the library catalogue. Unfortunately that someone just isn't me and I guess I'll be sticking to Lyn Hamilton for reasonably well-written antiques dealer mysteries.

It's a shame, because the premise and descriptions seemed so interesting in the listings. Too bad it didn't live up to its promise. But I'm glad the library has them, since they're exactly the kind of moderately enjoyable mind candy entertainment that the library should stock so that you can shell your limited hoard of book-buying cash on stuff you like more.

Read and finished Tim Powers' Three Days to Never, which I picked up from the library on the strength of its being his other Declare-like book, a description which is kind of vaguely accurate.

This time it's both weirder and more mundane, with the Mossad and some competing alphabet agency chasing down a father and daughter who unknowingly turn out to have access to a particular device which allowed earlier users to try changing the world by decidedly unorthodox means.

Entertaining enough, but didn't hold my attention the same way Declare did. Also, given the nature of the device, rather convoluted with all the twists and turns.

Mild recommend if you like supernatural spy thrillers mostly seen from the viewpoint of bewildered civilians caught up in the spying, references to Albert Einstein and Charlie Chaplin and Shakespeare's The Tempest, and multi-dimensional machinations involving men who fold themselves.

* Buggrit.
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