View Single Post
Old 02-20-2011, 11:58 AM   #9
SensualPoet
Wizard
SensualPoet ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.SensualPoet ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.SensualPoet ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.SensualPoet ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.SensualPoet ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.SensualPoet ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.SensualPoet ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.SensualPoet ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.SensualPoet ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.SensualPoet ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.SensualPoet ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
SensualPoet's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,295
Karma: 2607151
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Toronto
Device: Kobo Glo, Kobo Aura HD, Kindle Wifi, Nexus 7 (2013), Samsung Tab 10.1
Another possibly overlooked choice is Tarquin Hall's funny and absorbing series about New Delhi-based Vish Puri, Most Private Investigator. The Case of the Missing Servant and The Case of the Man Who Died Laughing are both available from Kobo and Kindle.

One reviewer stated: "Vish Puri, a private investigator living in Delhi, is a very likeable character. He will remind some readers of Columbo or Hercule Poirot, whose nattily dressed appearance conceals an analytical mind. The majority of Puri’s cases are matrimonial investigations into prospective partners. With the changes of a new modern India, detailed to provide an in-depth look at Puri and the world he lives in, families no longer know each other prior to the arranged match. Puri’s investigations reveal the personal backgrounds of the proposed husband or wife: financial, social, moral and any involvement in criminal activity."

The Financial Times said: "Puri is an Indian Poirot: an opinionated Punjabi with an ego as great as his girth and a passion for British tailoring, malt whisky and fiery chillis … Hall combines an insider’s insight with the eclectic eye of a good foreign correspondent."
SensualPoet is offline   Reply With Quote