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Old 01-06-2011, 10:58 PM   #7721
ATDrake
Wizzard
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Posts: 7,041
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Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Roundworld
Device: Kindle 2 International & Sony PRS-T1 & BlackBerry PlayBook
Read in paper Diana Gabaldon's The Exile, which is a graphic novel which tells part of the events from her time-travel romance novel Outlander from a slightly different perspective, rather than being a straight adaptation, according to the endnotes. It was okay, but neither the art or the presented storyline/dialogue were anything above average, imho.

Read on Kindle Morgan Llywelyn's Isles of the Blest, an adaptation of some classic Irish legend about a guy who goes to live among the fairies and learns that perfection may not be all it's cracked up to be.

I'm still not exactly sure how the story ends (a bit ambiguous what choice he makes to stay or go), but it was mildly interesting, though not up to her usual standard of work. But it was cheap and MultiFormat via Fictionwise and enjoyable enough. Don't think I'll be re-reading it much, though.

I think between the past week's worth of Celtic-inspired fantasy novels (about a half-dozen almost all at once), I've had a surfeit and need a break, so currently I'm flipping between two more paper books from the library:

Seth Grahame-Smith's Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, which purports to be a hidden history

Miranda Carter's George, Nicholas, and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I, which purports to reveal the personalities behind real history

So far Wilhelm reminds me of an insecure and power-mad Miles Vorkosigan gone horribly, terribly wrong (maybe Mark if he'd managed to achieve the Imperium) and I can't help flashing back to Sigmund Freud's assessment of his character in Nicholas Meyer's Sherlock Holmes continuation novel The Seven Per-Cent Solution.

Too bad there's probably no chance of a swordfight on a moving train in this one.
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