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Old 01-03-2011, 02:57 PM   #7683
ATDrake
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Join Date: Mar 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phenomshel View Post
…and now I'm reading "The Ninth Daughter" by Barbara Hamilton, which has to do with pre-Revolutionary war history and Abigail Adams.
Ooh. Barbara Hamilton is the pseudonym of my favourite writers, whose publisher apparently decided she should adopt it to try and break out of the midlist doldrums as a "new" author with that series.

If you end up liking Ninth Daughter, you might also want to look up Patriot Hearts under her regular name (nearly the same, but ends with -bly). It's a straight historical set from the viewpoints of Martha Washington, Dolly Madison, Abigail Adams, and Sally Hemings and pretty decent, though not nearly as good as The Emancipator's Wife, which is her Mary Todd Lincoln novel which was a finalist for a Michael Shaara Award for Excellence in a Civil War Novel. She also writes excellent sf/fantasy and other historical mysteries.

As for me, I finished Elizabeth Ann Scarborough's Song of Sorcery, which was a charming understated mildly comedic quest-fantasy. I enjoyed it enough that I'll be buying the three sequels in the series, perhaps if the niche re-publisher participates in the Read an e-Book Week sale that Smashwords seems to have. Otherwise, they've got a 25% off discount coupon on their website (but PDF only) and they're also available via Omnilit which did 50% rebate for CyberMonday (but again, PDF only). I'll wait and see.

Read a couple more R.A. MacAvoy. Really enjoyed The Book of Kells; I'm a sucker for time-travel tales of people getting sucked into another time and place to Help the Locals With Their Anachronistic Know-How and Discover Something About Themselves (in either direction of the time stream). And this one's got a Canadian in it, too! Plus Vikings in pre-medieval Ireland, always a bonus. Recommended.

Was a little disappointed that The Grey Horse was not a sequel. But it was a fairly decent tale set post-Potato Famine about the clashing culture of Irish tenants and English landlords and late Victorian politics, as the backdrop for a Faerie man's wooing of a stubborn Irish lass. Not as paranormal romantic as that description might make it sound in case curious PNR fans were wondering, since that's not really the main focus of most of the story. But an interesting, pleasant rural historical fantasy read.

To continue the theme of horses and authors named Elizabeth A*, partway through Elizabeth A. Lynn's The Silver Horse, which is the tale of a girl whose brother is lured away by the title creature into the clutches of some otherworldly being and enters the Land of Runaway Toys to bring him back. This is very short, about 1200 locations on the Kindle, and I suspect it was an older children's novel in its print incarnation. Cute and charming so far; a little reminiscent of Terry Pratchett's Wee Free Men, minus the Nac Mac Feegles.
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