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Old 12-20-2010, 11:25 AM   #28
emalvick
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Posts: 163
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Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Davis, CA
Device: Kindle 3
I think the problem right now is that all media industries (print, music, video) are in slow motion while the rest of the technology world is moving full stream ahead. The publishing companies (again broadly across media types) have been content with the previous hard-copy industry regardless of how well it was really doing, and they don't want to see change.

Then you have companies like Apple and Amazon who are working towards making a digital industry work, and I do think these companies have tried to work with the publishing companies as much as we hear about them bullying them.

It's a tricky industry that is in its infancy. I think that is why you saw the whole DRM vs. no DRM thing going on in the music business (think ITunes and Amazon), yet Amazon doesn't work without DRM for ebooks.

Most media industries need to rething their strategies and understand that the business models of the past 30+ years are not the business strategies that will work from this point forward.

Independent, small publishers have learned this thus they are actually gaining status. They have never been stuck in the big standard distribution business and have been willing to change as needed. You see sales of small indie books and music increase in the digital world. In fact, the digital world saves them money on manufacturing costs, and they pass the savings on to the consumer.

Unfortunately, for the consumer, it is difficult to see who the winners and losers are. The battles between retailers, publishers, and artists (authors, musicians, actors, etc) is not clear cut. This lack of clarity makes the consumer the loser in most cases, and that probably hurts the whole industry more than anything.

Piracy probably wouldn't be so rampant if the industry didn't make it such an issue. I think the music industry may be starting to figure that out through the models that are developing with no drm, etc. It is still a work in progress, but at least there is progress. We need more of that in the ebook world as well. The businesses need to embrace the digital world not avoid it.
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