View Single Post
Old 11-28-2010, 09:55 PM   #4
ZeroTX
New Reader
ZeroTX began at the beginning.
 
Posts: 18
Karma: 10
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: TEXAS
Device: NOOK Color
Quote:
Originally Posted by spec View Post
B&N already announced their version of android market coming in Q1 2011, you can already sign up for their developer program which is free. What that means is amazon should be able to sign up too, or b&n will have an antitrust dispute on their hands. If amazon is let to be a developer on nook color, that would mean they'd develop kindle for nook color. At least that what I'd do.

Q1 2011 is not that far, but guessing by tech skills you displayed in your post you probably know that calibre converts mobi to epub. I dont know how good the conversion is, but it's an option for the impatient.
It'll be interesting to see. I hadn't thought of the anti-trust angle. I can't imagine anyone not wanting to have their market be as big as possible, in this case Amazon. I have Calibre and have used it to convert some files (not for Kindle, but nonetheless). It's a great program!

I was really thinking of it in terms of the mass market. I don't think B&N is doing this in order to necessarily become a hardware company, but on the other hand it could be seen as a way to ween people over to NOOKbooks/B&N instead of Kindle/Amazon. The B&N purchased books experience on the Nook will still be superior to a Kindle app or a side-loaded book, so if price is equal, a Nook owner would clearly pick the B&N version of any given book, I would think.

For me what made the decision was the open standard. While I do own an iPod, I never use Apple's music format. I buy physical CD's and rip them as MP3 files, because I'd rather those files be available to me for the foreseeable future, regardless of what hardware I might end up with. Given the all out war we have with iOS vs. Android, there's a great possibility that my next device won't be an Apple product (yet to be seen). The difference here is that although the iPod has its own format (AAC), it still plays the universal standard format (MP3), whereas Kindle has its own format (MOBI), it will NOT read the universal standard format (ePUB). Now if Amazon figures this out and makes Kindles ePub compatible and makes a color LCD competing product, then we'll see...

Right now Barnes & Noble has won my business and that's a win for them this year!

-Michael
ZeroTX is offline   Reply With Quote