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Old 11-07-2010, 09:34 AM   #1
PeterT
Taking a break; Fed up
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Join Date: Nov 2007
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Article in the Economist on eBook Lending

Interesting article in the Economist that discusses eBooks, their pricing and the differences between eBooks and pBooks (my term for a Physical Book).

http://www.economist.com/blogs/babba.../10/steal_book

Quote:
AMAZON.COM says soon you will be allowed to lend out electronic books purchased from the Kindle Store. For a whole 14 days. Just once, ever, per title. If the publisher allows it. Not mentioned is the necessity to hop on one foot whilst reciting the Gettysburg Address in a falsetto. An oversight, I'm sure. Barnes & Noble's Nook has offered the same capability with identical limits since last year. Both lending schemes are bullet points in a marketing presentation, so Amazon is adding its feature to keep parity.

Allowing such ersatz lending is a pretence by booksellers. They wish you to engage in two separate hallucinations. First, that their limited licence to read a work on a device or within software of their choosing is equivalent to the purchase of a physical item. Second, that the vast majority of e-books are persistent objects rather than disposable culture.
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