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Old 10-23-2010, 10:02 AM   #13
chas0039
Sceptic
chas0039 is slicker than a case of WD-40chas0039 is slicker than a case of WD-40chas0039 is slicker than a case of WD-40chas0039 is slicker than a case of WD-40chas0039 is slicker than a case of WD-40chas0039 is slicker than a case of WD-40chas0039 is slicker than a case of WD-40chas0039 is slicker than a case of WD-40chas0039 is slicker than a case of WD-40chas0039 is slicker than a case of WD-40chas0039 is slicker than a case of WD-40
 
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Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: The Lake
Device: rooted Nooks, retired. JetBook Lite, Kindle 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by SameerH View Post
I'm not an electrical engineer, but let's see if I can help shed some light.

We use a lithium-ion polymer battery, which boasts a better degradation rate than Lithium-ion.

The numbers we received on the battery:

Testing shows 80% retentive capacity remaining after 300 charge cycles (charging it from 2.75V to 4.2V). That's about 5 years @ 1 cycle per week.

Slap some conservatism on there (say 60%) and you're left with 3 years to get down to 80% retentive capacity.
I am also not an engineer, but every site that is full of engineers says that these batteries start to die from the date of manufacture. They add that you can shorten the life with heat, but no where do they say you can extend the life beyond what it is. You are commenting on the effects of charging cycles. This is not the life span based on the manufacture date.

In any case, I hope you are right as, otherwise, I would assume a lot of annoyed users.
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