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Old 09-28-2010, 02:33 PM   #31
bill_mchale
Wizard
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Join Date: Sep 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven Lyle Jordan View Post
Neither am I convinced. What... you do all the things you mentioned on one sheet of paper? Or who carries around big tablets, small tablets, organizers, post-it notes, napkins and TP all at once? No... you use multiple types of paper for different things, grabbing them as you need them. You can as easily carry around 1 or 2 devices to do the lion's share of your work, and maybe grab a third when needed on occasion. I don't expect people to do everything on a smartphone (something I always have with me), but to be smart about using other devices when needed.
My point is, you generally don't need to carry paper around with you. You can usually find some sort of paper when you need something to write on. I.e., the notion of the napkin in the diner. In contrast, a device, you either have it with you, or you don't; if you don't have it, you can't use it.

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The white board is a bit larger. And that's all I'll say comparing white boards to napkins! You could try working at work...
Who works just at work anymore? As a system administrator, I can work anywhere there is a wireless connection to the internet. A couple of years ago at Christmas, I was using my phone to connect to work. When I worked more as a programmer, I use to figure out bugs in programs in also sorts of strange places.

Get two or three engineers or scientists together (like at a diner) and don't be surprised if they start talking shop and start using napkins to jot down notes are do thumbnail calculations.

Shoot, as a SF writer, I would expect you would do it from time to time as well when you get an idea for a story and want to see if it is practical or not (Though, I don't know if you write hard SF or softer stuff).

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"Farmed trees" used for paper are not sustainable, in that filling a farm with one crop ultimately damages the local environment. It takes decades to centuries to grow an adult tree after one is felled. It is incredibly environmentally damaging to process a tree into paper, with copious water use, the chemicals and bleaches used to produce the paper and subsequently dumped into the local watershed, and the carbon burned to drive that paper to your local store. Paper can only be recycled 2-3 times, before it is useless pulp (which is generally dumped in oceans or landfills at that point).
Well, for farmed trees the average is 25-30 years. Tree farmers tend to not plant slow growing trees. Also, one doesn't need to use trees to make paper.

In any case, the fact that there is a lot of waste now in the process of making paper does not necessarily mean that the process cannot be made greener.

Besides, as others have pointed out many electronic devices are hardly environmentally friendly either. We know that a fair number of electronic devices end up in land fills... and I bet one battery is worse for the environment sitting in a land fill than several hundred pounds of paper.

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And yes, junk mail needs to be stopped, too. Check out some of the services that will stop junk mail from being delivered to you... do your part!



For some things, yes. Not for most of the things we daily apply it to. And not for any business-related uses at all, as far as I'm concerned. We can do better. Now that we have the means, we should do better.

As to doing new things: You get used to... what you want to get used to.
Do you still work in business Steve or are you a full time author these days?

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Bill
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