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Old 09-17-2010, 09:45 AM   #5
pdurrant
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsvick View Post
I didn't read the entire article in detail, it's been a few years since I've done math at those levels, but it makes sense to me and I have to agree on a few of the points. I agree that using the radius is more intuitive than the diameter, you very rarely hear someone referring to the diameter of a circle.

My problem with it though is that "pie are square(d)" rolls off the tongue much more easily than "two tau are square(d)"
Umm... the area of a circle is one half tau are squared. (½τr²) And the circumference is tau are. (τr)

‘Tau are’ is simpler than ‘two pi are’. Of course, we could also say ‘pi dee’ but then for consistency we ought to use ‘one quarter pi dee squared'. Ugh...

The ½τr² is also exactly analogous with lots of other equations that deal with the integration of an equation with a constant of proportionality.

The link gives the example of objects falling in a uniform gravitational field. (i.e. on Earth, to a close approximation).

The speed of dropped item is directly proportional to the time it has been falling (neglecting air resistance and changes in the gravity field).

v = gt

The distance fallen is the integral of this: d = ½gt²



I must admit that the more I consider this, the more pleased I am with it.

Although I would hold out for tau day to be celebrated on the 6th of February, not the 28th of June!

And celebrations ought, of course, to reach a climax at exactly 53 seconds past 3:33 pm (or am if you're on night shifts). Because, of course, the ratio 333/53 approximates tau to three decimal places.

Alternatively we could have an ‘approximate tau lunch’ on 7th October, at 1:13 pm, since 710/133 is tau to six decimal places.
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